4 Ways to Be Consistent in Your Leadership

Are you consistent in your actions, decisions, emotions and motivations?

Summary
Transcript

Glen Jackson, co-founder of marketing and communications agency Jackson Spalding, shares four areas in which leaders should show consistency: in their actions, decisions, emotions and motivations.

“Consistency is often underrated as a leadership trait,” says Glen. “Consistency builds trust and it builds momentum and it builds continued growth within an organization from my perspective. There are four ways to be consistent, I think, in your life. For me it's being consistent in your actions, your decisions, your emotions and your motivations.”

Watch the video to learn more about these four areas of consistency and the effect it has on an organization’s culture.

From my vantage point is someone who helps lead a business, consistency is often underrated as a leadership trait. Being consistent as a leader helps so much established trust in an organization and you want to be seen as: “She is so consistent." "He is so consistent." "I always know where I stand with her.” That consistency builds trust and it builds momentum and it builds continued growth within an organization from my perspective.

There are four ways to be consistent, I think, in your life. For me it's being consistent in your actions, your decisions, your emotions, and your motivations. Let me break that down just a little bit. In terms of your actions, you want to do what you say you're going to do, and implement it with excellence. On the emotions side, you want to be of sound mind and tongue, from a consistency stand point. And on the decision side, you want to make decisions based on what is the wise thing to do and be a reflection of good discernment.

Finally, on the motivation side, the last one, you need to figure out what motivates you the most. For me as an accidental entrepreneur, as someone who is helping lead a team at Jackson Spalding, I want to encourage love and respect of other people. I think every person needs to figure out what motivates them and do it. And from a consistency stand point, every day at Jackson Spalding, I don't want people wondering what kind of mood Glen’s in. I want them to know. I want them to know every day am going to be the same man and the same leader I'm striving to be, not worrying about what kind of mood am I in today.

When you're not consistent as a leader, it can have tremendous impact on your culture. A healthy culture as Adam Bryant writes about in Quick and Nimble, is about a greenhouse, for me an unhealthy culture is a frozen-like environment where there is almost an ice age feeling to it. So when you aren't being consistent as a leader, you're also not attracting and retaining top talent which is one of the key elements of healthy cultures. And that fraying of culture is, long-term, a very dangerous thing and you want to avoid it.

Now on the opposite end, healthy cultures are about encouragement, and realization, and freedom, and joy, and love, and strong caring leadership, and success. I think a good barometer of a healthy culture is people don't walk around and talk about the culture of the organization all the time. You feel it, you see it, you want to be around it, it's attractive, and it just shines and people notice it.
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Glen Jackson

Glen Jackson co-founded Jackson Spalding in 1995. He provides leadership for the agency, many of its clients and organizations looking for inspiration. He has special expertise in real estate, professional services, crisis communicat...

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